Tag Archives: remnant sewing

Quilting for the Tropics

by jenny

My grandmother used to say “We lived in ‘the tropics’…” which included Guam  and Hawaii, during the time period leading up to World War II. When they retired, they moved to Florida, which she considered to also have a tropical climate.  And she wasn’t always happy about the heat and humidity in Florida. Being a practical quilter, she wanted to make quilts that would be useful to the prospective owners. One of my favorite quilts she made for us had a pieced top made of scraps leftover from when she made us flannel pajamas, and the backing was cotton sheeting. There was no batting in between. It was just the right weight, and kept us toasty warm but not suffocated like a heavy blanket would. The cotton backing was cool and almost slippery.

I kept those attributes in mind when I set out to make some quilts for our favorite non-profit organization, Plenitud PR.  They do workshops in sustainable living practices, organic gardening, rainwater management, and much more. Although the temperature is always around 70 to 85 degrees F, some of the workshop participants would appreciate sleeping with a light blanket.

I used cotton flannel remnants for the quilt tops. Remnants are usually what is left over on the bolt of fabric after most of the yardage has been sold. They are typically less than a yard in length, and packaged as remnants and sold at less than the usual price. At JoAnn Fabric, they are normally 1/2 the regular price, and sometimes go on sale for even less. Some cheaply made cotton flannel is wound onto the bolt so that the fabric grain is skewed. I always wash lengths of cotton flannel before cutting, then make sure the cut edges are straight, by cutting a little notch near the cut edge and ripping the fabric along the straight grain until I reach the end of the cut edge. Sometimes I have to cut and rip more than once to be able to rip straight to the other edge.

For these blankets, I embroidered plenitud.pr on the lower front. Now that I have looked up the web site, I see that it is Plenitud PR (without the ., but technically it is now PlenitudPR.org. Placement of the dot can be crucially important in our high-tech world). But since it is just a blanket now, and currently has no power to connect to the Internet (now, but how about in the future?) I will leave as is.

machine embroidery hoop jennyskip
hooping the fabric for machine embroidery

The backing is extra-wide cotton, made for the special purpose of backing quilts, so that it doesn’t have to be pieced. I spotted these bolts of extra-wide material at JoAnn’s, and was able to find several that only had a small amount left on the bolt. Another $core: I was given the “end of bolt” discount price for the yardage. The backings were cut just a few inches larger than the quilt tops, so that the larger edges could be folded over and stitched down for binding the edges. I used several of the machine’s designated quilting stitches for channel-quilting the tops to the backings, and for top-stitching the bound edges. Some of the stitches I wasn’t so happy with. For all the stitching, I used the walking foot, AKA Interchangeable dual-feed foot with the zig-zag attachment. I used the automatic stitching setting so I wouldn’t be cramming my foot on the pedal for a long time, but the tension and stitching looks very uneven on some of them. It’s not the prettiest stitching I’ve ever seen but ripping it out at this point seems unsustainable….

For historical information about quilting in the tropics from older generations, Hart Cottage Quilts site is fascinating to read.

Selfie-Tote

One last post for Selfish Sewing Week

Funny how one must proclaim it a special “selfish” holiday in order to justify making something for oneself…

I like making things for others but…

1) I don’t have a lot of confidence about my talents and abilities, and

2) It’s risky to spend a lot of time and money on something that the other person might not like or appreciate.

However, if I make something for myself,

1) If it looks crummy or I just don’t like it, my feelings aren’t hurt, and

2) I don’t worry about sending my gift off to Goodwill or the Island of Unloved Toys, Etc.

As I mentioned in the previous post, I did cut out an additional top: finished, and ok, but nothing spectacular. And I had cut out some pieces for a purse, tote, whatever you want to call it.

This item I made from scratch. No pattern, just knew sort of what I wanted it to look like, and went from there.

The body is an old denim remnant I got anciently at a yard sale.

purse making jenny skip.com
assembling the various parts and pieces

The liner is Willow Bend Bandana from the Alexander Henry Fabrics Collection c 2006 (ahem, yes, it has been in the stash that long).

bandana fabric craftsbyjennyskip.com
Willow Bend fabric for liner

The knit portion on the outside is half Picasso’s Moon art yarn and half red Mei Mei Bamboo in a circular stockinette.

denim and knitted tote craftsbyjennyskip.com
finished tote

The straps are from Cindy’s Button Company. I found a 1/2 yard remnant of Pellon Flexible Foam Stabilizer in the interfacing stash that was just the right dimensions to line the body, and used some plastic needlepoint canvas to line the bottom and top rim.

plastic needlepoint canvas as stabilizer
stabilizing the bottom

A small red zipper showed up in the zipper stash, and a packet of red bias binding provided the edging for an inner purse pocket and 4 loops to attach the leather straps.

purse lining craftsbyjennyskip
lining has a zipper pocket and a bound-edge pocket
tote bag bottom view craftsbyjennyskip.com
bottoms-up view

Had this idea in my head for years, but it took a designated Selfish Sewing Week to bring it into the real world. Thank you Rachael at imagine gnats for your inspiration!

Selfish Sewing

Um, yes…I do recall posting late last week that Selfish Sewing Week was coming up…now it’s almost over and I still haven’t done any sewing for myself. Pretty lame!

In my defense, I have been planning some projects…but haven’t carried out those plans to fruition yet (as of Thursday morning). We’ll have to remedy that.

Here’s what I planned:

1) Camel Ponte Roma & microsuede skirt

2) rayon blouse to match

3) black & gold boucle knit sweater

4) white embroidered cotton shirt

5) brown stretch jacquard lace skirt

6) white crushed voile top lined with white Posh polyester

7) denim & knitted art yarn purse with red leather handles

8) either a skirt or top in a leopard print

9) something out of that teal and gold plaid-printed jersey

10) rayon slip-dress

Have you stopped laughing yet? Looks like a tall order!

sketches craftsbyjenny skip.com
sketching the plan

But since I wrote down this list yesterday morning, I’ve already made the first two items and cut out the fabric for 2 other items. Each little project is economical in that I used fabric remnants. Sometimes it’s a challenge to come up with something wearable from a piece of fabric that is less than a yard.

#1: Camel Ponte Roma/microsuede skirt. The pattern for this is one I made, using an old skirt I bought at Beall’s Outlet, and tracing around it. I found two remnant bundles at JoAnn’s that were the same color: Camel, Cornstalk, or beige. Ponte Roma is always awesome, and to pair it with a faux Suede, seems timely!

#2: Rayon 1-yard top. This pattern was a freebie from Runway Sewing; I scoped it out on Pinterest. I didn’t have any 1/4″ bias binding around to apply to the neckline, so I used some 1/2″, and I didn’t like it all that much. And the neckline itself was way too big, resulting in a very sloppy look. I took a great big tuck in the front, making it look a bit like the Colette Sorbetto top, also a freebie pattern. You might wonder, “Why didn’t she just use the Sorbetto then?” The sleeveless Sorbetto is a little skimpy for me. I like my shoulders to be covered.

skirt & top jenny skip
Selfish Sewing Week skirt & top

So I wasn’t a total no-show for Selfish Sewing Week. I’ll be relieved to get back to non-apparel sewing, though.