Tag Archives: genealogy

We all love Green (Olive Greene)

Following along with Amy Johnson Crowe’s prompt for this week of #52ancestors, which is “unusual name,” I present a little summary of what I know of my 2nd great grandmother, Olive Greene.

Her full name was Olive Jane Greene, and she went by the nickname “Jenny.”

She was born about 100 years before I was, and lived her whole life in Cumberland County, Maine. Her father was a farmer. She was born when her father was 47 and her mother 44. Her oldest brother was 20 years older than she was. She was able to marry while her parents were still alive, so they could see their youngest child, and only daughter as far as I can see, happily situated in life.

In the first census taking after her marriage, they are listed as living with her parents. Jenny’s husband was described as a tinsmith by trade. In the next three census records, he is listed as manager of a local canning factory.

The couple were parents of two daughters who died relatively young, in their twenties (my 2nd great aunt) and thirties (my great grandmother). My grandmother (#52Ancestors 2019 pick number 1) did get to meet and know her husband’s Grandma Jenny and Grandpa Charles Herbert.

First Grandmother I Met

Crafting in the 21st Century is an eclectic sort of venture: we’ve documented mostly arts and crafts and practical projects, but writing is also a craft. We end up giving many of our posts a “family history” tag anyway, because they build up stories about who we are and what we like to do, and maybe why. One of the founding purposes of creating the blog is to record the stories of our life and times. For us, “creating 19th century crafts using 21st century technology” was supposed to be one of our tag lines, although we’ve strayed a lot!

With that intro, I want to opt into Amy Johnson Crow’s #52 ancestor challenge for 2019, and plan to steal a little bit of space from this craft blog to write about our gene pool.

Ethel H C.jpeg

If you’d like to sign up for the challenge, you’ll be sent a prompt once a week over the coming year, to jump start your work at this venture. Who knows what dimension will be added to your life, as you draw on the memories of your ancestors? They don’t want to be forgotten. The first prompt for this year is…”first.” So this is my grandmother, the first grandmother I ever met. She was born at the beginning of the 20th century, in the first week of January, in a log cabin in Germany Valley, Pendleton County, West Virginia.

The family moved to Oklahoma with her Uncle Baxter, who had bought a farm, when my grandmother was four years old. All the kids had to work hard. Her mother succumbed in the flu epidemic around 1918. Her dad became depressed, sold the farm equipment, and moved the family back to West Virginia where they stayed at the hotel in town, owned by other family members.

Ethel 16.jpeg

She wrote in her memoir: “Then our Dad became very unhappy with our situation and took us back to Oklahoma…again in June 1921…We were there one day when Dad killed himself by shooting himself in the head with a shot gun. I remember seeing him at the funeral and his head was so swollen it was twice the size it should have been. Grandpa sent a telegram to the aunts in W. Va….So they started dividing us up among the relatives—Martha went to Aunt Lola, Anne stayed with Grandma, Alice and Pete got married in St. Louis, Mo. on June 17, 1921 on our way back. Hattie went to Aunt Sallie, Bill to the hotel and Aunt Meade, and I went with Aunt Lillie and Uncle Baxter and Harry was already there. So we were scattered all over creation and another phase of our lives starts from there.”

First Gran took the train to Washington, DC, when she got a little older and became a nurse. She liked to sew, quilt, do all sorts of needlework, paint (by number mostly), garden, cook, and keep the house spotless.