Restoring Raggy

Poor doll! He got involved in a fracas and sustained a few injuries:

Shaggy jennyskip
Seen-better-days Shaggy

His hands, neck and arm were shredded (dog bite?) and one arm was limp from lack of stuffing. And one shoe was beginning to separate from its ankle.

Job #1  was to repair the gaping wounds.

I’ve had plenty of time to think about it. This project has been on the docket for a pretty long time, but it occasionally got covered up by a pile of fabric or a stack of mail, so it was out of sight, out of mind. Finally I picked up a hand sewing needle and found some thread that was close to this skin tone, and went to work.

After I fixed up his body, a thought occurred to me. “Dude, what happened to your clothes?”  He had no comment. I figured, why not make him something to cover up with?

First set of pants bombed. The clodhopper feet were too big to squeeze through the skinny pant legs.  The revised pair had velcro closures on the inseams. These pants are made from the actual several inches of pants legs that I cut off a pair of Skip’s pants [see prior blog post from 2015: Modern Hemming].

all ready jennyskip
With some makeshift clothing…

I confess, I’ve never been a whiz at making doll clothes. This quick-and-dirty “minimal effort” little project had me grinding my teeth as the tiny seam allowances sent fabric down the throat plate hole into birds’ nests that had to be cut from underneath to extricate them. I had a feeling that the previous clothes on this toy had something to do with the gaping slash on his neck; that the simple task of playing dress-up resulted in the doll’s near-decapitation. But although I don’t have a workable intuition about making clothes for this guy, I admire the workmanship that must have gone into making him. The meticulously fringed, pieced hair style, his embroidered facial features and chin-scruff, and his slouchy posture all give true representation of the “real” character [You know he’s not real, right? He’s a cartoon]. And then again, he was mass-produced.

Somebody somewhere came up with a plan for toys like this to be created and then mass-produced. I imagine somewhere, a factory is probably humming with machines 24 hours a day, sewing goofy smiles and eyebrows lifted in surprise on cloth faces, adding darts on ankles and outlining fingers in little plush hands. The line supervisor gets an order from the shipping department saying: “Ten thousand more Shaggies” and proceeds to upload the manufacturing process specs.

I did find this enlightening video on You Tube about toy designer Longia Miller, who I now hold in highest esteem! From watching the video, I see that her sewing machine is making use of a throat plate that has a tiny hole, down which it would be fairly impossible for a fabric to slip.

According to Wikipedia, one of the first mass-produced plush toys in the US was the Ithaca Kitty, in 1892. And apparently it was a 3-piece printed pattern that the buyer had to cut out, sew, and stuff, herself. From reading the narrative on the patent, I see that inventor Celia Smith listed a few reasons why her stuffed animal design was “well-adapted to displace” the designs of some other toys that are made from  “a number of pieces of cloth (eight or more)” and could be “dragged about by a limb until they lose their original scanty ICO resemblance to an animal and fail entirely to appeal…”

You gotta love the visionary minds of the toy designers and makers,  demanding realism, durability, safety, and worthiness of entertainment value to be built into our children’s playthings.

 

3 thoughts on “Restoring Raggy”

  1. Skooby-Doo where are yoooouuuu! lol, wow, great save. oh those tiny seams would test me for sure. love the back story and history. the cats from space….?lol, now that a meme waiting for something crafty. happy crafting! cheers

  2. Stink!! I missed my calling in life. Wasted all that time making ballet costumes for whiney little girls. grrrrrrr Although it was a delight to see how beautiful the costumes that were a roaring success, danced with the dancers on stage. Thanks for this super informative blog. Enjoyed it so much.

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