Now that Valentine’s Day is Over

I apologize in advance to all of you who hate Valentine’s Day. I used to hate it, too.

Now, I just hate the fact that I want to make a special project to commemorate the holiday, and it doesn’t turn out right.

This year, I wanted to make the giant tote bag I saw in the current issue of SewNews magazine, that is decorated all over with shiny foil iron-on lip decals you can make on your cutting machine.

This would have been the first iron-on project I made with the cutting machine, if it had turned out right. First strike against me was that the free download from the magazine’s web extras files, was a .pdf and my cutting machine didn’t like that file extension. I tried to save it as a something else file, and it wouldn’t. Oh well, not too big a deal, I found a bunch of other free pairs of lips images that seemingly would work as well. I unrolled the roll of foil iron-on film and discovered that there isn’t all that much product rolled up in that cardboard tube, it’s mostly cardboard! Who knew? Then, for strike two, I loaded the film into the machine, it said liner side up, cut out the decals, and then realized the liner side was actually the opposite side of what the machine cut. Now, to salvage those 6 pairs of lips I directed the machine to cut out, I will have to manually cut them out from the other side using an X-acto knife. Then we’ll see how much trouble I can get into, before it’s three strikes and I’m out.

Meanwhile, we had a nice dinner with some great friends.

Table set


Honey-baked ham for an entree

We continued the festivities into the weekend, when we splashed out for breakfast at our local favorite early morning eating place. Check out their romantic breakfast specials:

Valentine’s Day Weekend specials at 43rd St. Deli

Who said the way to a man’s heart (or person’s heart) is through his (her) stomach? Just add imagination, some laughs, friendly people, and a little salt and pepper, and you’ve got an awesome holiday.

Eventually, the bag was finished:

finished bag


My VALENTINE

For all my fellow family history bloggers who are keeping up with Amy Johnson Crow’s #52ancestors challenge, the prompt for this week is “love.”

For me, the obvious relative to go with that prompt is my 2nd great-grandfather, Valentine Fitch, or Voitzsch, as his surname was known before he sailed across the pond.

Although, to my ears, Valentine for a man’s surname sounds strange, I’m told it was a common given name for Germans, Spaniards, and Scandinavians. It’s a swashbuckling, romantic name!

By many accounts, he was born in Prussia and emigrated to the US with his parents and some of his numerous brothers and sisters, and perhaps cousins. The parents settled in New York. Valentine and many of his siblings moved to the midwest and put down roots in Winnebago County, Illinois.

Ancestry. com has a cadastral map of 1886 that shows V. Fitch’s parcel of land in Section 9. His name is plentiful in historic records of the US in the 1800’s and 1900’s, not only documenting his life and times, but also his son’s, grandson’s, and nephews’ lives, who were given the same name as his! Alas, though, I’m still in the dark about his time of death. He is not buried next to his wife in the Cherry Valley cemetery. Where did he go? What did he do? His name might as well have been Ozymandias, for all I was able to discover about his death. But once, he was an immigrant, a pioneer in the promised land of America, with his whole life of opportunities ahead of him!

Improv Quilting

The impetus for this post came from a magazine I subscribe to, Sew News The current issue has an article entitled “Piece Out” on page 40 about improvisational piecing. I love this for several reasons: 1) I don’t like to waste fabric, 2) I like free-form designs, and 3) I want to feel like I’m getting my money’s worth from subscribing to publications.

Very early in my artistic history, I felt pressure to conform to other people’s ideas of what art should look like. In elementary school art class, we were told to stick little torn pieces of tissue paper on a piece of card stock with paste to make (the teacher hoped) a colorful mosaic-like picture. When I was finished with the assignment, my picture had blobs of white and maroon tissue paper. Everyone else’s had various combinations of the primary colors. The teacher said I must not have listened to the directions. Probably so. I was embarrassed. But at the time, I was really into arranging those white and maroon pieces of tissue paper on a page.

Anyway, the Sew News article shows 2 improvisational quilting projects: a zipper pouch and a pillow. In both, the maker had sewn together strips of fabric, then accented the white or light-colored pieces with sashiki-style rows of hand-stitching in a complementary color of thread. They looked super cool and fun to make. And, I had one lone little pillow form lying around that was just begging to be covered.

So here is my take on improvisational quilting:

Improvisational pieced pillow

First, I sewed together some leftover strips of fabric, ironing the seam allowances on the wrong side toward the darker strip as I pieced. I decided to put a machine-embroidery motif on the front. This one is from Urban Threads Letter Perfect Alphabet.

The opening in the back of the pillow is envelope style, so I added batting and backing to two sections of the pieced fabric, right side of backing fabric facing the right side of the pieced fabric with the batting under it. I sewed the envelope edges together, then turned and pressed them.

I decided that this pillow might benefit from having pink piping around the edges. For sewing on Wright’s piping, I like to use a piping foot.

clear piping foot

I sewed the piping around the edge of the front piece, clipped the corners a little bit, then pinned the two envelope pieces on to the front, the longer one in front of the shorter one, with both right sides facing the right side of the front panel, to sew around the edge again, right where the stitching was from sewing the piping on. I just stitched over it from the other side, leaving an opening for turning inside-out. Once turned, I hand-stitched the opening closed very close to the piping.

stitching the opening closed

Another interesting thing to make out of leftover pieces of fabric is a yo-yo. I added a couple of different sizes of yo-yo’s for embellishment, even a heart-shaped one in honor of Valentine’s Day next week. The little gizmos for making yo-yo’s consist of a plastic plate tightly fitting inside a tray. You can find various sizes and shapes from tiny to Jumbo, and in flower, heart, and clover shapes. They are made by Clover, and each kit costs about $5-$10 apiece.

Here’s what the back looks like:

For some odd reason, I could NOT edit these last few iPhone photos to get them to come out rotated once to the right!

Hope you have fun crafting for your Valentines!

The Surprising girl Behind the grandma

“Surprise!” That is the theme of this week’s #52ancestors prompt by Amy Johnson Crow. Isn’t it funny how you can’t imagine your grandparent, wrinkled, stooped in stature, and white-headed, as the young woman she once was? That is, unless you are lucky enough to find a picture.

I got a text message this morning from Family Search reminding me that today is my Grandma’s birthday, and if she hadn’t died when she did, she’d be 120 years old now!

Grandma as a young woman

In addition to the birthday reminder, I got in the mail today a packet of pictures and memorabilia from a guy whose family bought the farm that my grandpa (eventual husband of the woman in the picture) and his family lived on, back in the early 1900’s. He was holding back from posting his pics online, so it would be a surprise!

My Aunt Virginia wrote this little memory about her mother:

She loved children and animals. In olden days we had hoboes that would come to the back door begging for a cup of coffee or a piece of pie. She never refused them and they never left hungry. Even in much later years when it wasn’t safe to help strangers, she would give a helping hand against our warnings. In her last years, when there was just the two of us, I was able to get her out of the house to go places. She opened up to people and made a lot of friends who thought she was a kind and beautiful person. She had a dry sense of humor that everyone enjoyed. I miss her much.

Happy happy birthday, Grandma! We’re glad you were born!

Using Real and Virtual Libraries for Family History Research

Would you rather look at a computer screen, a phone screen, or an actual paper page in a book? Your answer may rely on which of the “generations,” as defined by Wikipedia, you belong to. The younger the demographic cohort of a person, the more they seem to prefer the transient image, the disappearing snap photo, the meme: something to ponder briefly, identify with, for what it’s worth,  and then move on to the next thing. The older the demographic cohort of a person, the more they seem to prefer a book, something tangible and permanent, that can sit on the shelf and collect dust but be there, faithfully, when one has a notion to look something up.

My mom, possibly classified as being on the cusp of the “Silent Generation” and the “Baby Boomers,” (see Wikipedia link above) reveled in doing what one cousin recently dubbed “the legwork” in family history research: going to the courthouse, copying down information in longhand  because there was no copy machine at the facility in the 1960’s (and her script can be very difficult to read), traipsing up and down mountains in foul weather to find old neglected graveyards, knocking on the doors of unsuspecting relatives we’d never met before and doing impromptu interviews with them,  and taking blurry pictures of the old portraits in wood-and-plaster frames on their living room walls.

Eventually, she compiled all her notes into a book. This photo includes two versions of it.

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For the first version, the spiral-bound one above, she asked me (as a much younger person) to draw the cover, with the background mountain formation the locals called “Ol’ Tom of the Rocks.” I guess she decided to go with something a little less primitive for the cover of the second, more mass-produced version. I think she self-published about 100 copies and sold them for about $10 apiece. They sold out quickly. Quite a few libraries across the country have non-circulating copies.

I have the original manuscript and I’ve thought about reprinting it, since people still contact me, craving a copy of it.

She recorded all she could find of the descendants of Thomas Bland, born c. 1740. I’ve entered a lot of her info  into my pedigree chart, and thus have enough hints generated that I will never run out of updating tasks for the rest of my life.

To find the nearest physical location where a copy of her book resides, or any other family history book, you have only to look it up in the virtual library card catalog in Familysearch.org. If you’re reading this, of course you know that Family Search is a free web site you can join, collaborate with others, post your pedigree, which becomes part of the global tree (except for the entries for living people, which are suppressed from public view).  It’s also a treasure trove of historical records. Sign in, go to the link “Search” near the top of the page, then go to “Catalogue.” Choose to search by “Titles” and then type in “Thomas Bland.” If you click on one of the Thomas Bland of Pendleton County entries, you can find a link inside, for “WorldCat” database, which will show you all the libraries that have a copy, beginning with the one closest to you. You may be able to get your local library to “borrow” it from one of the other libraries.

This may be possible with any book you find in the WorldCat. Real or virtual, you’ve gotta love your library. This is for week #5 of Amy Johnson Crow’s 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks Challenge. 

Making a Board Game Console with a Digital Flavor

by Skip

My son approached me with a project: build a frame to fit over a flat screen TV with a plexiglass cover. The TV and frame would sit flat on a table. Okay…but why?
His answer: to play board games
I responded: so how does that work?
His answer: you connect a computer to the TV with an HDMI cable and view an image of a game board. Then you move your pieces around on the plexiglass cover.
My response: why not use the board that comes with the game?
His response: some games are completely digital and don’t have boards.
My response: so why not just play the game on the monitor?
His response: because with this method you can use customized game pieces that are scaled to show the difference in size between a scrawny little hobbit and a 20 foot tall orc. And you can hold the pieces in your hand. The game board can also have animations like a flowing river. It’s just a lot cooler than playing a straight up digital or board game!!
My response: Got you!!

So let’s talk about specifics. How big is the TV? Where do its cords come out? How is it vented for cooling? What is the distance from the screen to the plexiglass?


We got the TV out on a table and determined that if we used 2×4 lumber and made a frame 24 1/4-inch by 39 1/4-inch, that would fit over the TV. We would add 1/2″ thick plywood brackets at each corner with felt pads( to protect the table it sat on). The brackets would elevate the frame 1/2-inch off the table providing a 1/2-inch vent around the perimeter. We sanded the frame up to 220 grit sandpaper after filling some of the imperfections in the 2×4’s with wood putty made up using the sawdust from the sanding and Titebond II glue.  We painted the frame with a primer, two coats of black acrylic paint and topped it off with a clear coat of acrylic.

My son picked up a large sheet of 1/4-inch thick plexiglass from a big box store along with a plastic cutting knife.

The width of the plexiglass was perfect, but it was too long. Using a straight edge, we scored the plexiglass along a line to give us the 39-inch length we needed. It was recommended to score over the same line 7 times, but we went with 10 scores. We put a board under the plexiglass at the scored line and cleanly snapped off the extra length.


We drilled a 1/8-inch hole at each corner of the plexiglass, set the plexiglass on the frame where we wanted it, and using the holes in the plexiglass, drilled a pilot hole in the wood at each corner. Using some wood screws and fender washers we attached the plexiglass to the frame.

Close-up of plexiglass attached to frame at corner

My son attached some felt pads to the back of the TV to elevate it off the table for better ventilation and to bring it closer to the plexiglass. If this works, we are done. Later we may elevate the plexiglass off the frame with spacers at each corner and the middle of each side to provide for better ventilation.

felt pads attached to frame


I was concerned that all this plexiglass would be a static magnet for dust. My wife suggested that my son wipe down the plexiglass with anti-static dryer sheets and she retired to the sewing room (her woman cave) were she knocked out a large muslin bag with a draw-string closure to store the frame in.

muslin storage bag

In retrospect, you have to weigh the pros and cons: a really cool computerized playing surface weighing several pounds and costing several hundred dollars versus a 12-inch by 16-inch cardboard box weighing less than a pound and costing $70 for a pro edition. Cool wins!

your move!

THe Ancestor I’d Like to Meet

Keeping up with the weekly prompts from Amy Johnson Crow’s #52Ancestors 2019 blog post, this week I’ll feature one of the ancestors I’d most like to meet.

Roger Conant was my 9th great grandfather. He was one of the founders of Salem, Massachusetts. He didn’t come to America on the Mayflower, but on another ship from England in about 1624. According to his Wikipedia blurb, he didn’t get on well with leaders in the Puritan community in the New World at Plymouth, and moved on to establish another settlement with folks who were less prone to violence and religious fanaticism.

Donna Seger, eminent author of the Streets of Salem blog, wrote in her “Massey’s Cove” post in 2016, that Roger Conant and his associates got short shrift in the history books. The famous statue of him, shown above, encourages the mind to jump to Witchcraft and the notorious Salem Witch Trials. Although he died in 1679, just a few years before all the hysteria and subsequent trial happened, he must have known many of the participants. He was said to have been active in Salem affairs his whole life.

That is what I would ask him about, if I actually could meet and communicate with him.

“What really led up to the Salem Witch trials?” I’d ask. “I didn’t see the Conant family name in any documentation about accusers or accused, or judges. Did you see it coming? Did your children play any part in it? If you hadn’t died just prior, would you have been able to contribute a voice of reason to shut it down?”

Through the ap “Relative Finder” I see that I have several 1st and 2nd cousins, 10 and 12 times removed, as well as more distant relations, included in the Salem Witch Trials group, but none of them Conants. Perhaps that is because many of those ancestresses didn’t have the hidden vulnerability of owning property (or eventually owning property once their relative died) and not having a male heir in the picture to protect their interest, and to pass it along to, as theorized by researcher Carol F. Karlsen in her book The Devil in the Shape of a Woman: Witchcraft in Colonial New England (New York: W.W. Norton, 1987).

Yep, it would be nice to get his take on it!


We all love Green (Olive Greene)

Following along with Amy Johnson Crowe’s prompt for this week of #52ancestors, which is “unusual name,” I present a little summary of what I know of my 2nd great grandmother, Olive Greene.

Her full name was Olive Jane Greene, and she went by the nickname “Jenny.”

She was born about 100 years before I was, and lived her whole life in Cumberland County, Maine. Her father was a farmer. She was born when her father was 47 and her mother 44. Her oldest brother was 20 years older than she was. She was able to marry while her parents were still alive, so they could see their youngest child, and only daughter as far as I can see, happily situated in life.

In the first census taking after her marriage, they are listed as living with her parents. Jenny’s husband was described as a tinsmith by trade. In the next three census records, he is listed as manager of a local canning factory.

The couple were parents of two daughters who died relatively young, in their twenties (my 2nd great aunt) and thirties (my great grandmother). My grandmother (#52Ancestors 2019 pick number 1) did get to meet and know her husband’s Grandma Jenny and Grandpa Charles Herbert.

10 cards from the January 2019 SSS Kit

I’m not one of those demonstrator bloggers with hundreds of thousands of subscribers, who shows how to make the best use of the monthly Simon Says Stamp kit.

I’m just an obscure follower of the card-making craft, who wants to do a little bit of show and tell. Some of these, I pretty much followed the blogs of other cardmakers.  But only because they were so unbelievably adorable! Hope you don’t judge me too harshly!

  1. The one with the pom-pom streamers.  The sentiment was cut out of one of the 6 x 6 card stock papers included in the kit, and positioned on top of a coordinating paper, with pom-poms threaded on 3 double strands of the thread in the kit. fullsizeoutput_42fa

2. The gift tag–a couple of pieces of the coordinating card stocks put together, to be attached with a ribbon.fullsizeoutput_42fc.jpeg

3. The snowflake kisses sentiment one. Happy thoughts (not often thought of by people who live where it never snows)…fullsizeoutput_42fd.jpeg

4. The hot chocolate one. Not the most elegant, but faintly reminiscent of chocolate.fullsizeoutput_42fe.jpeg

5. The one with the snowmenfullsizeoutput_42ff.jpeg

6. The snowflake is winter’s butterfly one. Butterfly didn’t come with the kit, but I had one lone blue one in the stash.fullsizeoutput_4300.jpeg

7. The “ease into Valentine’s” card. I guess, for people in the cold climates, wintertime after Christmas is over, is very distinct and separate from wintertime before and during Christmas. Hence, maybe even polar opposites? North vs south poles? Santa vs penguins?fullsizeoutput_4301.jpeg

8. The twirling skater one. This one I did almost exactly as the demo in Clips-n-Cuts blog except I used a navy blue card base as the background. I’ve never made a twirling motif such as this before, and I thought it was the coolest! The skater die was included in the kit.fullsizeoutput_4302

9. Another penguin Valentine card. The coordinating blues and plaids, are so fresh.fullsizeoutput_4303.jpeg

10. The snow-covered blossom one. So this little floral sprig fell off of a spray I bought from Hobby Lobby in an attempt to brighten up the place after the Christmas stuff went down. I glued some white pom-poms onto the blossoms to imitate snow piling up on them. fullsizeoutput_4304.jpeg

So anyway, that’s 10 cards from me.

The Challenging Mr. Fitch

The designated theme for this, week 2 of Amy Johnson Crow’s #52Ancestors blog post prompts for 2019, is “challenge.”

The Challenging Fitch ancestor, my great-grandfather, has brought so many spine-tingling responses, whenever I found some unexpected trace of him popping up in my research.

None of the old-timers seemed to know much about him. My great-grandmother was married to him (very briefly) in 1896. Their son, my grandpa, was born in 1900. Historical records prove they were married at the time of my grandpa’s birth, and then later divorced, but he took his mother’s surname the rest of his life.

Wonder why she went to such great lengths to keep even the whisper of the name Fitch away?

great grandmother Nina, wife of Fitch for a brief moment

Gradually I began finding snippets of information about him, or at least, someone whose name was similar to his. The biggest treasure trove of hints came from a My Heritage newspaper vault. Apparently Fitch had moved to a tiny town in Indiana which had a nosy gossip columnist, and a reporter who noted every court action from the minuscule to the mighty. From this source, I learned a lot about his marriages, job, family members, what he did on the weekends, and all kinds of events either humdrum or tragic.

He worked at a dairy plant in Chicago, and apparently serviced a sales or maintenance route to several cities in Indiana, Wisconsin, and Illinois. At one point, according to the newspaper, the plant where he worked closed, and he could have chosen to move and work at a similar plant in Wisconsin, but didn’t. Around that time, he petitioned the court to have the time and place of his birth determined.

For someone supposedly born in 1875, the child of a German immigrant and an American mother, he did not seem to be a stable representative of that demographic, in my mind . He was married to at least six different women. There were some shady newspaper accounts, either about him or someone with his same name.

The Fitches, overall, were a challenge to find, and I still cannot find Great-grandpa Fitch’s mother’s family where they are supposedly from in Erie, New York.

From a member profile in My Heritage, and from some DNA matches in Ancestry, I found some likely relatives who were descended from Voitzsch ancestors in Prussia. The original US immigrants of this line were supposedly buried in a graveyard in Erie County, New York, according to a source. I found the roster of burials for that cemetery, and one name very remotely like Fitch or Voitzsch came up: Gaubeloupe Freitztsch Folilztson (compared to the name listed on historical records Johann Gottlob Fitch or Voitzsch) and wife were buried there, and their markers possessed the only possible dates that could have worked out to be the immigrants. Not exactly proof positive, but some DNA matches to me have these ancestors listed on their pedigrees, so it may be a good tree to bark up!

Recently I was contacted by someone whose ancestor bought the farm where Nina lived at the time of her death. Having already posted several salient newspaper articles about the life and times of Nina and her subsequent husbands, he says he may have a photo somewhere of the elusive Mr. Fitch!

This is the 2nd of #52Ancestors.

Using current technology to create 19th Century crafts