Category Archives: Sewing

A Left Brain Autumn Table Runner Post

For Autumn table runner number 3, I’m doing a left brain sort of a project. Actually they’re all pretty left brain for me, because rather than offering a tutorial or a gallery of images, I tend to analyze everything that went into a project. To the nth degree.

This project looks pretty simple, but it was troublesome to pull off.

I had it in my head that I wanted to do some machine appliqué text letters. But nothing in my pattern files fit. Ditto for the two of my favorite sources for machine embroidery patterns,  Embroidery Library site and Urban Threads. I found the appliqué font for this project, Sporty Script, at Rivermill. It was delivered in a zipped file, including several different sizes. I chose the biggest size, 7 inches, for this.

As this is the first sewing project featuring text as the main design element, that I’ve done in a while, I was experimenting. Just playing around, really, to get a feel for what I could do, how it would end up. My fabrics were remnants, of course, of about a yard each for the top and bottom. The top piece is Hoodie’s Collection for Michael Miller Daisy Drama  in fall colors. The bottom is a mustard-colored Fabric Traditions NTT print with glitter shot through it. At first, I wanted the fabric of the text appliqués to be a yellow-orange or a sherbet-color, but I tried mocking that up, and didn’t like the resulting look much. In the end, I decided on the green batik. It picks up some of the color of the green and beige and yellow in the top fabric, but it’s more subtle than a solid orange or yellow would have been.

The thread for the satin stitch around the letters was a light gold Robison-Anton rayon, color Patricia. When I first bought an embroidery machine, I got several boxes of thread with it from the dealer. I didn’t realize this spool was from the special Marcia Pollard Elegance Collection, as I guess the free box was a sampler of various RA threads. But I liked the color, and have used it for a lot of machine embroidery. The machine’s embroidery software has a matching feature, so that if you don’t have a color your pattern calls for, it will bring up the closest color you have on hand, if you have entered all your inventory into the program’s database. Anyway, I forgot to search in the matching db, but took off for the sewing store thinking I could just grab another spool of “Patricia,” pay, and leave. Wrong. They didn’t have it. So to be on the safe side I got 3 spools of similar gold colors, hoping one of them would be a good match. One of them was ok, but it took some testing to determine that.

To do appliqué embroidery on a quilting cotton-type fabric, I hoop up the fabric and stabilizer(s), in this order: 1) tear-away stabilizer on bottom, 2) table runner top background fabric (the Daisy), 3) fabric of the text appliqués (the green batik), 4) possibly a transparent water-soluble stabilizer on top, but not always necessary. I didn’t break it down into a detailed mathematical placement here, so the lettering is somewhat haphazardly scattered. I did do some general arithmetic to make sure I had enough surface area to put 13 letters down, including 3 upper case ones, that were in a 7-inch font size. As I hooped and appliquéd the letters one or two at a time, I didn’t get the same amount of space in between them, like you would if you were hand-lettering from a Speedball chart. I will need more practice positioning with chalk or a disappearing marker, before trying to eyeball it next time.

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Sorry to report that, weirdly enough, after many attempts, I could not get this photo, taken with an iPhone in the portrait position, to rotate into the correct position!  A WordPress phenomenon! I’ve found since, that a workaround is to only use iPhone photos taken in the landscape position. Unless you know how to insert some code that will get the program not to automatically rotate your portrait photos, which I currently don’t.

I added some leaves and acorns cut with the Accuquilt Go! Big machine and Fall Medley template and applied with Steam-a-Seam 2. Then stitched around the shapes with a machine satin-stitch.

I loaded the top, bottom, and batting onto the quilting frame, with the long edges pinned to the leader cloths, in hopes that it would only take two passes to quilt with the Qnique. It did, but the bobbin stitches for about half of the runner were horrifically ugly.

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Ugly bobbin stitches with obvious tension problem.

I briefly considered leaving this the way it is, because the top looks fine, and hopefully no one will come over for dinner and snoop underneath the runner, to see what the underside looks like. But dang! If they do, seeing this will ruin their appetite for sure. So I picked out all the ugly stitches while watching the Blacklist last night on TV.

Next, redid the meander stitch quilting using sewing machine with a free-motion spring foot, then squared up the corners and edges. For the binding, nothing I had in a package looked good, so I went into the scrap bin and cut up all the scraps of the green batik into 2-inch wide strips, sewed them together, folded the strips in half long-wise, and sewed the binding out of that.

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The applique saying is “Happy Fall Y’all” and with a black cat and a velvet pumpkins on the table, it’s beginning to look like Halloween around here.  Never mind about the digital photo orbs in the background.

Autumn Table Runners

This is the second autumn table runner post, the first one presented a few posts ago, here. That first one was pretty much general quilting, with a pieced top and a whole underneath side, with batting in between, quilted on the Qnique longarm, or “mid arm,” as some people designate it. The raw edges are bound with Wright’s Quilt Binding.

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pieced Autumn table runner

If you had to categorize this next one, the main descriptive word that comes up is “appliqué.” It is quilted, in that small pieces of fabric were put together on the top. But the underside is not pieced, unless you count that I ripped it in half length-wise and serged the two long halves together.  And there is no batting in the center.

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appliqué Autumn table runner, with Sheenah

Naturally, the fabrics used in these projects are mostly remnants from the 50%-off bin at JoAnn Fabric Store. I had a couple of larger pieces of fabric, say, almost a yard each, for the top and bottom. The top is a plaid fabric with metallic orange-gold threads woven into the check pattern. The backing is a striped very low-pile flannel in yellow, tan, and tobacco-ey colors that wash together.  You can see the center seam of the runner above, and I decided to make one side a maple motif, and the other side an oak motif. All the leaf, pumpkin, and blackbird appliqués were cut with the Accuquilt Go! Big machine and templates. I backed each appliqué piece with Steam-a-Seam 2 double-sided fusible web, also cut on the Accuquilt cutter, and then ironed them on to the runner top side.

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deciding where the appliqué shapes were going to go, and securing them down

After the appliqués were applied, I wanted to pull them all together with branches and tree motifs. I looked at lots of methods for yarn and textile couching, which is technically just laying down strands of yarn or string and then sewing over them. Looking through my box of sewing machine feet, AKA my Foot Stash, I found that I had a heretofore unused Yarn Couching Feet Set.

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couching kit

The two plastic feet each had a small hole (one was larger) through which the end of the yarn was to be threaded. You hold the end of the yarn in one hand and move it around, if in “free motion” mode, and then sew over it. (You can also use it with an embroidery hoop and software pattern.) The kit also contained two different types of hooks to mount on the back of your machine, to use as thread guides for the yarn, a device for threading thick yarn into small holes, and some sample yarn and a DVD and basic instruction sheet.

I found this process to be pretty interesting, but this yarn was very slubby and every so often I had to cut and re-thread, because the big slubs wouldn’t go through the hole.

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yarn couching on the oak side

Next, after couching, I needed to sew down the appliqués. Originally I wanted to do a big thread-art project, using different colors of thread to add shading to the pumpkins and also do the tree trunks and branches in embroidery thread. But since I used the thicker yarn, I decided to just basically outline the shapes in one color and not do a whole bunch of shading, and leave it as sort of “primitive” colors and shapes.

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finished runner, with free-mo embroidered appliqués

After going over all the appliqués with free-motion embroidery, I spray-starched the backing and ironed both top and back, making sure the back piece lined up with the top. Then I sewed all around the edges of the top  with Wright’s Bias Tape Maxi Piping in black, with the piping facing inward, toward the center of the cloth. I then sewed the backing on, right side facing the appliquéd side of the top, and sewed the edges, leaving the piping sandwiched between, and leaving about a fist’s length of seam unsewn, for turning. After turning inside out, and hand-sewing the opening closed, I pressed the edges, making sure the piping was peeking out and at the very edge of the seams. Then I top-stitched around the edges, about 1/4 inch from the piping edge, using thread that matched the top (and back for the bobbin thread).

Sometimes people will comment on the nice stitching, so I wanted to come clean and say that it isn’t me who’s responsible for that, it’s my Foot Stash. I use a special see-through foot with a little groove in the bottom, for sewing piping, and another special see-through foot with a metal attachment, called an edge-stitching foot, for top-stitching.  And the machine has a triple-stitch function that I use for pretty top-stitching, setting the length on a 5 or so (normally it’s more like a 2.5 for ordinary seams).

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Skip’s natural-edge table decked out for a Fall party

It was fun to make, and the cats definitely like it.  Sigh.  Cat people will understand.

 

The Covers

While waiting to be caught up in the next project, I’ve been turning out a few interim FO’s (finished objects) that loosely fit into the category of “covers.”

The main thing they have in common is that they’ve used up larger pieces of fabric that have been lounging in the fabric stash.

These are mostly cotton lightweight lap quilts we sent to the non-profit organization that is closest to our hearts, plenitudpr.org .

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The tops of the quilts are cotton flannel remnants pieced together, and the backs are cotton remnants in sizes of about 2 yards. The solid yellow one above possibly has some polyester in it. But the idea was to have a smooth, bedsheet-like side and a warm, flannel side. The edges of the backs extend over the tops, and are folded over and sewn down with a machine featherstitchto make borders.

img_2460This one is a lap quilt made from the selvedges of fleece fabrics. A few  years back, I was making fleece blankets a lot, and trimming them with packaged Wright’s fleece binding. First, Wright’s discontinued the royal blue fleece binding that went perfectly with Florida Gator trademark pattern fabric. Now, you’ll be lucky if you can find fleece binding on eBay in any color other than black or white. Normal people, I guess, would trash the selvedges, but I threw them in a box, and this is the end result. This little quilt of sewn-together selvedges can also be turned around and used for light non-fiction reading if we get tired of watching TV in the La-Z-boy. Fun for the whole family.

Next, if you’ve seen my Pinterest page, you might find that I’ve gone nuts pinning tablerunners. These little projects are wonderful for expressing creativity, but not getting bogged down in a big, long, quagmire of obligation like you would get making a full-sized tablecloth or a queen-sized quilt. It’s just a little slice of a quilt, the slice with all the good stuff in it!

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As soon as we put a covering of any size on a flat surface, a cat’s bohunkus is right on top of it.

This tablerunner was an experiment, using remnants. The top is 5-inch squares pieced together, and the back is one whole piece, about a yard of 44 or 45-inch wide cloth, cut in half lengthwise and pieced together on the short sides. I longarm quilted it, loading the short sides on the frame and rolling out the length. I used the meander stitch, and although I thought I had the tension right from the previous project, it came out with some of those spidery-looking ugly  stitches on the back. When Lorraine came over and did a little project, we decided that one problem with the tension was the cheap-o thread I had loaded up. Without even thinking, I got a cone of thread that I normally use in the serger and threaded it up, bobbin too. Next time, we will try thread designated for machine quilting.

 

 

 

Is it Time to Start Knitting Yet?

It’s been a long time since I posted anything about knitting…

Temperatures in the 90’s and 100’s, egregious humidity, dog days of summer…are a few reasons why knitting isn’t on my mind lately.

However, that doesn’t mean I haven’t been knitting!

I’ve tried a few projects, but they just didn’t work out for me. So I decided I’d work on a hat, at my leisure. I have a feeling it’s going to fit a very big-headed person, since I didn’t consult any pattern but cast just a whole bunch of stitches on to a circular needle. Tired of starting patterns, goofing up, and not knowing where or how I went wrong. There’s pretty much no good TV on at night, so we’ve been binge-watching Netflix shows.

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Sheenah and big-head hat

I came across a Netflix show that offers the best of both worlds for me: Slow TV National Knitting Night. It’s national for Norway, that is.  Wonder how that would pan out with an American TV producer:  hours and hours of knitting on TV?  Apparently, when the knitting episode originally aired in 2013, it was a very popular program in Norway. See more here from the Craftsy blog.

I started watching it, and every time I got ready to get up and do something else, a new, interesting scene came up. [I haven’t finished it yet. For some reason, Skip didn’t find it as compelling as I did! Maybe the same reason I don’t thrill to watching hours of woodworking shows and listening to the soundtrack of a saw blade.] The TV stars of knitting  got a project going (knitting a sweater for a tricked-out Harley), a contest going (beating the record for making a sweater from scratch; that is, from the sheep’s hide to the finished article), and all sorts of sidebar activities featuring historic knitting patterns, viewing the gorgeous seascapes the country offers, meeting enthusiastic knitters, touring a knitting museum. All with beautiful music and English subtitles. It’s a great show!

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Pony boy lounging on the quilt I’m trying to sew a border onto

 

Meanwhile..

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More inspiration for the onset of knitting season

What’s on your needles lately?

 

 

 

Family History in a Quilt, c. 1980’s

When we had lots of family members descend for the Beach Weekend, we were dragging out bed linens from the closet to accommodate folks sleeping on the beds, couches and floors. I found this quilt my grandmother had made. Part of the crazy-quilt patches had come unsewn, so after everyone left, I took it to the sewing machine to mend and repair it as best I could.

I’d forgotten that my grandmother wrote on the back of it. She had a whole set of these little tubes of “embroidery paint”  similar to this modern-day product (click the link to see).  For a time period, she was very prolific with the embroidery paint, making pillow cases, sheets, all sorts of things. She had been in the habit of stamping a design or motif onto a piece of fabric, then embroidering (or drawing with the tube paint) over the stamped designs.

This is what she put on the back of this quilt:

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For John, made by Gran in 1985

Here, on the backing (which looks like it probably was an old sheet, so thin here it is almost transparent) you can see the underside of some heirloom quilt stitching, all hand-sewn. In the next photo, you can see the top side of the feather-stitching, probably done in a few strands of contrasting-color embroidery floss.

The quilt top itself is remarkable too.

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double-knit patch quilt

It’s made of patches of double-knit fabric, which was an innovative fabric type for those of my grandmother’s era (she was born in 1906). See this article at Seamwork about the differences between the double knit fabrics available then vs. now.  John said, “I remember it [the quilt] was really scratchy, the sort of polyester material that leisure suits were made from.”  Hence, the soft cotton sheeting on the back of the quilt, which side would go next to the tender skin of a little 4 or 5 year-old great-grandchild.

I’d like to say that I matched the embroidery thread and repaired the blanket in the style and manner of the original–but for me to do that would involve quite a learning curve. I picked a decorative stitch on the sewing machine and put the pedal to the metal. For any curious posterity, it will show obvious mending by machine.

Meanwhile, how enlightening to have this information!

Creativity on Island Time

The Family Beach Weekend of 2016 has come and gone; the flurry of activity in planning, purchasing, and preparing has now evaporated into the vivid orange, pink and purple Gulf of Mexico sunsets…but we have great memories of our creative pursuits.

Photography: it’s not hard to get a beautiful shot in this place! Everything is incredibly photogenic.

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Captiva sunset

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Creative posturing at the pool     (photo by Gabriel M)

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Tiny hermit crab
Sewing/quilting/knitting: We always try to scout out creative hubs when we travel around, and we happened upon a great little shop on Sanibel Island called Three Crafty Ladies. This unassuming little storefront opened into a treasure trove of art yarns (at very affordable prices!), a wide selection of fabric and notions, specialty patterns, artisan beads and jewelry-making supplies, paints, charcoal, pastels, brushes, lots of art supplies, shells, and all arranged in a very organized and gorgeous display. I picked some things for future projects.

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some fab fat quarters from Three Crafty Ladies

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San Clemente bag pattern designed by Stephanie Prescott of A Quilter’s Dream copyright 2008

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“Late Night Traffic Jam” Row by Row Experience from Three Crafty Ladies
This little kit is a cute reminder of sea turtle nesting at the beaches this time of year.  A Row by Row Experience is something like a Shop Hop, where you can visit quilting shops in a circuit and get each shop’s kit, then assemble all of the kits into a quilt made up of each row. Or you can just make a wall hanging or table-top quilt from the single kit.

Three Crafty Ladies has many cute little designer kits, featuring beach and Florida wildlife motifs, all fabulous!

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signature fabric plate from Three Crafty Ladies
This little cotton sateen fabric plate, also from Row by Row Experience, can be incorporated into a quilting project or sewn onto the back of it.

Art: Creativity abounds in these beach towns (Sanibel, Captiva, Fort Myers). Everywhere we looked, we saw paintings, sculptures, all sorts of arts and crafts. The ceiling fan paddles were painted with tropical fish, and murals and wall art decorated the whole interior at Rosies’ Cafe. Every restroom had a whimsical seaside theme. Displays of shells and wildlife showed up in lobbies and hallways.

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painting of Blue Heaven in our hotel living room
Creative Cuisine: Even the humblest of eating places had great, creative food selections!

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Shrimp and grits from Doc Ford’s Rum Bar and Grill at Captiva
We had our family dinner at the Doc Ford’s in Sanibel. Both had gourmet offerings, and the one at Captiva even had a book signing event going on, with the prolific author (and restaurant owner) who created the character Doc Ford, Randy Wayne White.

Improv: was a surprising highlight of the weekend — surprising because they pulled together a show on the last night without any planning prior to the trip! All the kids and grown-ups enjoyed this fun and hilarious stand-up show with plenty of audience input.

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Improv Show
Family members who came from far and wide have gone back to their homes.  Some are already starting the fall school semester or will start next week, while others have the whole month of August left of summer. We had a great, creative family beach weekend!

Super E-Z Family Beach Bags

by jenny

I like summer sewing projects to be quick, functional, colorful, and fun. These bags are for our family beach weekend this summer. For the past few years we’ve scheduled a beach (or, near-beach, or similar-to-a-beach) weekend for the kids and grandkids to all get together and have a party and relax before school starts up again.

We get motel rooms close to each other, so that the kids can go back and forth to be with their cousins, aunts, uncles, and us. We let them pick all their own activities except for one big family dinner during the weekend.

So far, it’s been fun and relaxing: no big expectations, they can go to nearby attractions if they want or just lounge, go from pool to beach and back, get grocery-store food and eat in their rooms or go to the restaurants they choose.

This year, we wanted to give them some little mementos and practical things for the stay, so we made up some simple beach bags for each child, couple, or family unit, so they can tote stuff around: pool toys, towels, wet bathing suits, groceries, or whatever.

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beach bags

I used up lots of stray bottom-weight fabrics from my fabric stash, as well as some wet-resistant fabrics that I’d bought to make diaper covers for some of the little grandkids (too little too late though, I think they’re all potty-trained now).  Anyway, they are cute fabrics and came in handy for this project, to make lining for the bags. I was going to keep it simple and not line them, but I tried it on one and liked it a lot.

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cutting liner to match fabric

 

I had lots of remnants that could be used for straps: I bought a big roll of red, white and blue flag-motif (it looks like elastic but is not as stretchy as real elastic) at a close-out sale for about a buck.  And got some other kinds, as each bag uses quite a length of strapping, like about 3 yards each.

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remnant strapping

They’re not the coolest but they are, at least, a functional souvenir of the 2016 family beach weekend.

Here’s how we made them:

Riding the Coat-tails of my Jacket Success…

By Jenny

After my successful jacket project with Craftsy I decided to do another jacket, this time on my own, with another pattern and no online instructions or lifeline to help me out, in case I got in over my head.

This was a remnant project in that I used mostly fabric remnants from JoAnn’s clearance bin. Since remnants at JoAnn’s are typically 1 yard or less, I counted myself lucky to find 3 matching remnant rolls, which added up to enough fabric to make a jacket. Incidentally, I was looking at the wrong side of the fabric and picturing that as the final finished article.  When I opened the fabric rolls, I saw the right side of the fabric: it was shiny like satin and about twice as vivid in color as the underside! I used a synthetic suede remnant for the skirt, and a 4-way stretch remnant for the top.

In the end, I wasn’t 100% happy with the results, but I learned a lot.

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jacket, top and skirt

I chose a Butterick suit pattern with the name Connie Crawford as the designer [B5336], thinking that the Sewing Personality Connie Crawford’s touch would make this a hot pro project. I was very impressed with the procedures and details, but also found some deep disappointments.

Good thing #1: The pattern comes in a plethora of sizes! You can even get it in a size 6X (that’s 42 – 44 W). It says on the front “Modern Fit with Ready-to-wear Sizing”–I guess that’s true, the size range I bought came in Xsm to Xlg.

Good thing #2: Two jacket views, one with lapels and one without. Both views look like a classic suit jacket. You can have patch pockets in front or not. Both jacket and skirt were lined, so they looked rather tailored.

Good thing #3: There’s a big section in the pattern for fit adjustments if your figure is in need of some; like fuller arms, larger or smaller bust cup, pear or apple shapes, or slanted shoulders.

Disappointment #1: There was a missing piece. I guess they decided at some point to combine the waistband piece instead of having it in 2 pieces, 21 and 21A as shown in the pattern. Or maybe the 21A is only included in the larger sizes? I tried to go online and look up the pattern to see if there was any explanation but couldn’t find a jot anywhere.

Disappointment #2: In step 15 it talks about the jacket front lining (piece 15) but labels it piece 3, which is the same size and shape, but nevertheless had me utterly confused.

Disappointment #3: In step 20, it says to under stitch to the break point of the jacket (what is the break point? I couldn’t find the term anywhere else in the directions.) And I had trouble with the previous under stitching from step 13. It was extremely awkward to under stitch the way the instructions described.

Disappointment #4: The whole lining was sewn to the jacket with right sides together, so that a seam had to be opened up in order to turn the jacket right-side out. So in step 22, when the sleeves were sewn to the sleeve linings, it said to match the back seams to avoid twisting. But it didn’t elucidate on just how to do that, so I ended up doing it the way it seemed to me to be logical to do, but it was wrong more than once, and I had to rip it out both times and sew it again. A hassle!

Disappointment #5: This was the skirt waistband. Other skirts I’ve made call for an elastic strip to be inserted into the waistband through an opening that is later slip-stitched closed after the elastic end is sewn to the beginning. Then you can stitch in the ditch on the side seams to anchor the elastic to the fabric. In this pattern, the waistband is sewn to the top of the skirt with the raw edges of one side of the waistband even with the top of the skirt, then the elastic is sewn onto the seam allowance of the waistband, then the waistband is folded over and stitched to the skirt. It was a bad move because the waistband and elastic were very bunchy and the fabric got rippled and puckered. It was just a bad look. Then I had to hand-tack the hem up, and the synthetic suede fabric (called sueded knit) was pretty hard to pierce with a hand needle. Now that the skirt was lined with a woven lining fabric, it had no “give” to it like a knit, and was actually a little tight-fitting. Looks like I’m going to have to lose about 5 or 10 lbs before I feel very good about wearing it.

Disappointment #6: There were mondo pattern pieces; 21 to be exact. However, quite a few of the 21 had to be cut not only from fabric, but also lining and interfacing as well. That was a lot of cutting to do! I had to rest for a week. Would you believe that for this project I used 6 different types of fabric? Two linings, 3 fashion fabrics (the top wasn’t included in the pattern; I used another pattern that only had 3 pieces), and one large amount of interfacing.

Disappointment #7 but Good thing #4 to save for later: The finished outfit has much more of a Fall vibe to it than a Spring one! My fault because I looked at the underside of the jacket fabric to begin with. And the outside temp was already up to 90 degrees this week. So I guess this outfit will be ready to wear in about 6-8 months…

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The cats were in no way disappointed

A Crafty Craftsy Class Boosted my Sewing Self-Esteem

by jenny

People sometimes ooh and ahh over the featured sewing projects in the blog, and I have to laugh that they think I have superior talent and ability, or something. Truthfully, if I can do it, just about anyone (who has been sewing for decades and decades) can do it. Sewing never came naturally to me.

My mom was a Home Ec major in college. Even though she went into the medical field and also later taught public school, her college major included cooking, and sewing clothes, drapes, and slipcovers for furniture. Late in life, she made some fantastic Baltimore Album quilts which, in my mind, are very complex items to sew. She was somewhat ambidextrous and she was good at math, but claimed she had no artistic ability.

My brain was apparently wired very differently. She considered me pretty much unteachable.

My junior high school Home Ec teacher, Miz Thomas, was in a continuous state of teeth gritting whenever I (along with my equally good-for-nothing classroom work group) was in contact with her. I did manage to make a red A-line skirt in her class (I think my mom finished it). This launched a long career of me imagining great items of clothing, and falling short when it came to actually making them and being willing to show up in public wearing them.

Fast forward a generous number of decades, to me taking a Craftsy Class online, about Garment Industry Secrets with Janet Pray.  The real object of the class was to make a jacket that is rather like a classic Jean Jacket, but with a couple of different details. The pattern features some design elements that are a bit complex for my humble little repertoire: interfaced collar and cuffs, topstitching, curved seams, front button placket, topstitched breast pockets with flaps, and welt pockets in the lower front, and they want you to sew without using pins.

I chose a fabric that was not at all recommended. Why did I do this? If I was going to go through all the motions of conformity, and had traced the pattern and painstakingly cut it out, why would I use a fabric that wouldn’t provided happy results? One, I had this fabric in the stash for at least 10 years. Two, although I have a large fabric stash, it has lots of 1-yard pieces, but not too many 3 1/2 yard pieces of anything. And I didn’t want to buy a nice big expensive pile of yardage to make a mess out of.  And three, I thought it might look good with a purple department-store-bought dress I already own and am not ashamed to wear in public.

So although my project wasn’t glitch-free, I was ok with the result, I had a good time doing the class, and as the pattern and the tutorial are still good, I look forward to trying another take on the jacket some time.

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finished Islander jacket from Craftsy Class

True Confessions! Some of the problems I caused in the project that I had to overcome:

Thought the cuffs were 2 collar pieces and sewed them together, and trimmed and clipped the seam allowance before I realized they were cuffs, not collar. Had to pick all out with seam ripper.

Chose a sheer, burn-out fabric that was actually see-through in some places, showing serging on the underside of the seam allowances. It didn’t take long pressure with a hot iron very well, to adhere the interfacing, and the texture was somewhat crinkly, and it got scorched in a number of places. Because of the sheerness, I decided not to make the welt pockets because I thought it would look too busy in the torso area. Using the recommended jacket-weight fabric, all you’d see on the outside would be the small diagonal neatly-trimmed and topstitched slash pocket openings  in the torso area.

Ripped out an imperfect seam in the sleeve, and re-sewed it only to notice later that the burn-out roses in the fabric were shredded by the seam-ripping and also burned by the iron. Had to cut out and re-sew a new 3-piece sleeve.

Had to re-sew the front facing twice, because it was crooked and puckered.

But overall, I’m happy with the result! You can see more pics of it on the Craftsy projects page.

 

 

 

 

 

We Got These Pillows Covered

Pillows have been around for centuries. Here’s a web site that displays some gorgeous antique pillows, and includes prices, many of which are in the thousands of dollars!

pillows craftsbyjennyskip.com
pillow stack

I’ve been making some pillow covers, with much leaner price tags. The secret to saving money is in playing the retail shopping game with sales, coupons, and shopping the remnant rack.

The 2 back pillows have tops that were pieced from little squares of flannel left over from the Cowboy Rag Quilt. So, in effect, they’re remnants of remnants. All the rest of the fabrics are just remnants.

Using remnants helps me to be more adventurous in the projects I decide to do. If I mess it all up, it’s no great loss, but sometimes I end up making some exciting little gems, that really look like they cost a lot more!

I made these two sets of pillows for some favorite folks I know.  A Creativebug campaign going around, called #make2share challenge,  is asking people to give handmade things to 2 people, then challenge them to do the same. Sort of like “pay-it-forward’ but leaving the choice of currency up to the creative mind!

Click here to read about the #Make2Share Challenge

Why not try the challenge, too? It sounds fun…