Category Archives: Gardening

The Dearth of Social Media

I’m slowly coming back from a 10-day fast from Social Media. Some of my friends have done the same, making the 10-day fast not just a pity party of one, but really quite a social experiment.

Some of the results of this time period are eye-opening!

  1. Of course, I had more time on my hands that I felt obligated to fill, doing something else. Being a crafter, you’d think I’d have had lots more time to  make crafts. However, I cut back on watching You-tube videos of craft techniques because—You-tube is a form of social media. So my idea stream dried up a little.

Some of the activities that were suggested to do, rather than stare into the social media screen, included reading, exercising, cooking, communicating with real friends rather than virtual ones, hobbies, and cleaning.

Here’s another idea: decorating with LIVE Halloween decorations!

I downloaded a couple of new Kindle books and read them, but hey! I was still in the habitual posture of staring at a little screen. Reading a novel is different than reading the little sound-bites and meme captions that you work through for hours a day on Facebook and its cronies Instagram and Twitter. Is a novel, then, better? Am I a better person for sailing on a ship in an ocean of complex constructed plot lines with character development, rather than splashing in the puddles of meme expressions and punchlines?

2. During this time, we celebrated our anniversary, and I didn’t post a pic of these flowers on Instagram like I’ve done past years…

roses jenny skip anniversary roses

Skip is pretty good with sending beautiful flowers and spreading around a lot of happiness that way. But I couldn’t help wondering if posting the pics is…gulp…humble-bragging? Ugh, Social Media will catch you up in that.

3. Some of my “friends” posted that they were shocked when they realized how much time they spent on those chummy social sites, and they’re going to set a timer in the future. And what a coincidence, a new iOS came out during the 10-day fast, which now actually logs the amount of time I spend on the phone or tablet.  It divides the time into these  categories: Social Networking, Productivity, and Creativity. I can schedule time to stay away and set limits and restrict myself from certain things. I could probably find a way to fool it into recording something unproductive as productive, but what if it finds out I’m trying to buck the system? I don’t want to be made into an unfavorable example when the Singularity comes around.

4. I’m more aware of my humanness, since I also sustained a physical injury (spider bite?) during the social media fast, probably when I was gardening. That goes to show what happens when you leave the virtual world and try to participate in real-time activities!

spider bite jenny skip After about a week and a half

The first couple of days I had some serious aches and pains in my right armpit and felt like I was running a fever, but I wasn’t. It felt like a hard, tough miniature heat-infused hockey puck was underneath the bite.  As you can see, it’s right at the area my arm would rest on the desk while typing. I kept bumping it on everything. I finally found these colloidal band-aids to keep it covered up, and the swelling underneath gradually went away, after many days.

colloidal band-aid jenny skip covered with colloidal band-aid

Perhaps staying off social media sites for 10 days won’t break any long-held habits, but it did give me a long, slow breathing space to ponder the time I’ve actually spent, engrossed in some things I don’t really want to care about!

“Whad J’eet?”*

Even with mounting stress going on in your life, like the aftermath of hurricanes, with loved ones out of the range of communication for days on end, and some loved ones visiting the ER, and painful betadine burns in your eyes, you gotta eat.

It’s something that you can take control of.

A while back, when all the courses on Craftsy’s web site were on sale for about $15, I bought this course Cooking For Two.  

My reasons for shelling out money for an every-day-type-of-cooking class: 1) we seem to be wasting a lot of food due to lack of planning.  2) I wanted us to eat more vegetables and fruits.  3)  I envisioned it as  an activity we could do together, instead of watching reruns on TV in the evening. The instructor, Carla Snyder, really knows how to make tasty food! I’ll add a 4th reason: If I can only scarf a small amount of calories a day without piling on weight, then let me spend it on food that tastes really good.

So far we’ve made pesto sauce, sautéed  gruyère-stuffed pork chops with mango salsa, chicken breast with lemon caper sauce and kale, and rib eye steaks with roasted root vegetables.  All dishes were super delicious, and so much fun to do!

pork and mango jennyskip
pork and mango
chicken, kale, jennyskip
sautéed chicken with lacinato kale
raised-bed herbs jennyskip
herbs harvested from our raised-bed garden
Oh, by the way, don’t think that we’re such great natural artisans and crafts-people that we breeze through food projects. No, we (I) make bone-head mistakes in this arena as monumental as any we’ve (I’ve) made in the shop or sewing room. I screwed up the garbage disposal by shoving a bunch of woody plant stems down it, so there were a few hidden costs to these dinners…what with the plumber having to make a house call…and while attempting to grind some pepper into the fry-pan on the stove, the grinding doo-hickey broke off the bottle and sent a bazillion bouncing peppercorns into every nook and cranny in the kitchen, as well as flood the pan. I like the taste of pepper, but wow, man.

pepper grinder jennyskip
dang defective pepper grinder doo-hickey
steak and potatoes jennyskip
steak and roast carrots, potatoes and red onion

Sorry that these photos show the dinners just after we started digging in, rather than the stylized views of the meat glistening on the plate in its caramelized crust, next to a neat bed of side items either marinated, sautéed, or oven-roasted. The photos of the three dinners bring to my mind R. Crumb’s comic “Let’s Eat!”  Google it and see if you agree.

I hope I’ve conveyed in this post, that cooking together has been fun! Too bad you can’t taste for yourself how good the flavors are!

 

  • American Southern for “What did you eat?”

Raised Bed Garden Love!

Happy Valentine’s Day! Our garden is about 3 months old now, so we wanted to post a little something to show the progress.

It’s exciting to roll with the possibilities, puzzling to respond to the problems!

Possibilities:

Fresh, wonderful, veggies and fruits

Interesting new recipes, tried-and-true old recipes

Reading about gardening, talking about it with friends

Combining rows of plants that are compatible

 

Problems:

Something has been nibbling on the cabbage leaves

The Savoy Cabbage died off for some unknown reason

What to do when it gets cold enough to freeze

 

Here’s a tiny documentary of our progress:

Meanwhile, we’ve been enjoying the fruits of our labors.

broccoli jenny skip
fresh-picked and lightly steamed broccoli for dinner
quinoa burgers jennyskip
Quinoa burgers with fresh parsley from our garden

The quinoa burgers recipe came from the cookbook Eating the Alkaline Way. It has some unusual ingredients, but we found it to be very tasty! (Even Skip! Normally he can’t even pronounce the word “quinoa” without a smirk, haha!)

 

Planting Time

As you may have seen from our previous post, we’ve gone all out for planting a raised-bed winter garden. In the prior blog entry, we go through the process of building the planters out of wood harvested from our own back yard and bolstered with our daughter-in-law’s no-longer-needed bed slats, and filling them with nutrient-building amended potting soil. We have great hopes that the planters will make it easier and better on us oldsters, to be able to maintain a home-grown garden. The planters are about waist-high, so we’re saying “no” to back-breaking shoveling, hoeing, and bending over to weed.

Today I picked out some winter veggies from our local Garden Center that are supposed to work for our growing season, although technically, I’m told the optimal time for planting the winter crop was last month. We will see if we can keep our little project going.

plants and herbs jennyskip
selection of winter veggie plants and herbs

We have a couple of strawberry plants, various herbs, lettuce, arugula, broccoli, and a couple of different types of cabbage. We like greens, which would be an acceptable winter crop, but for me, lots of collards, turnip greens and kale are a dietary no-no (kidney stones).

raised bed planters jennyskip
raised bed planters

Some sustainability experts say that it’s best that your garden is situated somewhere you’ll naturally see it and come in contact with it every day, like say, a spot you walk by on your way to go to work. These guys are out on the back patio, sort of hidden. If we open the blinds in the hall bathroom, we may be likely catch a glimpse of the planters if we happen to wander into that bathroom. Otherwise, it’s “out of sight, out of mind” for the garden. Maybe if we set the alarms on our cell phones each day to “go check out the garden” then our recent efforts won’t slide by the wayside. Sheesh! The ancestors had some valid motivations to tend to their gardens, such as “you want to eat some real food, don’t you?”

planters jennyskip
planting time

The weather report says we’re not supposed to have a freeze any time soon. About a week from today, it says, the temperature is supposed to go down to 35 F at night. The hay that we’re using for mulch will keep the moisture in the soil, and if it rains very hard, will prevent the dirt from splashing up onto the plants. Hopefully our shade cloth that is on order will get there by then so we can be ready to protect these little babies!